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Neurology. 2014 Jun 17;82(24):2187-95. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000000517. Epub 2014 Jun 4.

Joint effect of mid- and late-life blood pressure on the brain: the AGES-Reykjavik study.

Author information

1
From the Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences (M.M., T.B.H., L.J.L.), Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, MD; the Departments of Gerontology and Geriatrics (M.M.) and Radiology (M.v.B.), Leiden University Medical Center; Icelandic Heart Association (S.S., O.K., T.A., V.G.), Kopovagur; the Departments of Neurology & Radiology (O.K.) and Geriatrics (P.V.J.), Landspitali National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; the Department of Neurology (O.L.L.), University of Pittsburgh, PA; and the Faculty of Medicine (P.V.J.), University of Iceland, Reykjavik.
2
From the Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences (M.M., T.B.H., L.J.L.), Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, MD; the Departments of Gerontology and Geriatrics (M.M.) and Radiology (M.v.B.), Leiden University Medical Center; Icelandic Heart Association (S.S., O.K., T.A., V.G.), Kopovagur; the Departments of Neurology & Radiology (O.K.) and Geriatrics (P.V.J.), Landspitali National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; the Department of Neurology (O.L.L.), University of Pittsburgh, PA; and the Faculty of Medicine (P.V.J.), University of Iceland, Reykjavik. LaunerL@nia.nih.gov.

Erratum in

  • Neurology. 2014 Aug 26;83(9):867.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We hypothesized that in participants with a history of hypertension, lower late-life blood pressure (BP) will be associated with more brain pathology.

METHODS:

Participants are 4,057 older men and women without dementia with midlife (mean age 50 ± 6 years) and late-life (mean age 76 ± 5 years) vascular screening, cognitive function, and brain structures on MRI ascertained as part of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study.

RESULTS:

The association of late-life BP to brain measures depended on midlife hypertension history. Higher late-life systolic and diastolic BP (DBP) was associated with an increased risk of white matter lesions and cerebral microbleeds, and this was most pronounced in participants without a history of midlife hypertension. In contrast, in participants with a history of midlife hypertension, lower late-life DBP was associated with smaller total brain and gray matter volumes. This finding was reflected back in cognitive performance; in participants with midlife hypertension, lower DBP was associated with lower memory scores.

CONCLUSION:

In this large population-based cohort, late-life BP differentially affects brain pathology and cognitive performance, depending on the history of midlife hypertension. Our study suggests history of hypertension is critical to understand how late-life BP affects brain structure and function.

PMID:
24898928
PMCID:
PMC4113458
DOI:
10.1212/WNL.0000000000000517
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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