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Kidney Int. 2014 Aug;86(2):246-50. doi: 10.1038/ki.2014.190. Epub 2014 Jun 4.

Taming the chronic kidney disease epidemic: a global view of surveillance efforts.

Author information

1
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA.
2
Azienda Ospedaliera Papa Giovanni XXIII, IRCCS-Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Bergamo, Italy.
3
Kidney Epidemiology and Cost Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
4
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
5
Department of Medicine, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.
6
Clinical Informatics, Amsterdam Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
7
Renal Division, Würzburg University Hospital, Würzburg, Germany.
8
1] Renal Medicine, Toowoomba Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia [2] Centre for Chronic Disease, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
9
Centre for Chronic Disease, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
10
Renal Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
11
1] Renal Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia [2] Schools of Medicine and Human Movement Studies, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
12
Institute of Population Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
13
Public Health and Medical Statistics Group, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
14
Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
15
Department of Nephrology, Yaizu City Hospital, Shizuoka, Japan.
16
Nakayamadera Imai Clinic, Takarazuka, Japan.
17
Clinical Research Support Center, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

Chronic kidney disease is now recognized to be a worldwide problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality and there is a steep increase in the number of patients reaching end-stage renal disease. In many parts of the world, the disease affects younger people without diabetes or hypertension. The costs to family and society can be enormous. Early recognition of CKD may help prevent disease progression and the subsequent decline in health and longevity. Surveillance programs for early CKD detection are beginning to be implemented in a few countries. In this article, we will focus on the challenges and successes of these programs with the hope that their eventual and widespread use will reduce the complications, deaths, disabilities, and economic burdens associated with CKD worldwide.

PMID:
24897034
PMCID:
PMC4593485
DOI:
10.1038/ki.2014.190
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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