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Int J Mol Sci. 2014 Jun 3;15(6):9924-44. doi: 10.3390/ijms15069924.

Steatosis and steatohepatitis: complex disorders.

Author information

1
Institute of Pathology, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 25, Graz A-8036, Austria. kira.bettermann@gmx.de.
2
Institute of Pathology, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 25, Graz A-8036, Austria. tabeahohensee87@gmail.com.
3
Institute of Pathology, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 25, Graz A-8036, Austria. johannes.haybaeck@medunigraz.at.

Abstract

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which includes steatosis and steatohepatitis, in particular non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is a rising health problem world-wide and should be separated from alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH). NAFLD is regarded as hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome (MetSy), being tightly linked to obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Development of steatosis, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis often progresses towards hepatocellular carcinogenesis and frequently results in the indication for liver transplantation, underlining the clinical significance of this disease complex. Work on different murine models and several human patients studies led to the identification of different molecular key players as well as epigenetic factors like miRNAs and SNPs, which have a promoting or protecting function in AFLD/ASH or NAFLD/NASH. To which extent they might be translated into human biology and pathogenesis is still questionable and needs further investigation regarding diagnostic parameters, drug development and a better understanding of the genetic impact. In this review we give an overview about the currently available knowledge and recent findings regarding the development and progression of this disease.

PMID:
24897026
PMCID:
PMC4100130
DOI:
10.3390/ijms15069924
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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