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Can J Diet Pract Res. 2014 Summer;75(2):72-7.

The Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) and reduction of chronic disease risk factors in Canada.

Author information

1
Avondale College of Higher Education.
2
University of Manitoba.
3
Loma Linda University.
4
Medical Nutrition Therapy Northwest.
5
Lifestyle Medicine Institute.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The short-term effectiveness of the nutrition-centred Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) lifestyle intervention for improving selected chronic disease risk factors was examined in the Canadian setting.

METHODS:

A total of 1003 people (aged 56.3 ± 12.1 years, 68% female) were self-selected to participate in one of 27 CHIP interventions hosted in community settings by Seventh-day Adventist churches throughout Canada, between 2005 and 2011. The program centred on the promotion of a whole-food, plant-based eating pattern, and daily physical activity was also encouraged. Biometric measures, including body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (BP), blood lipid profile, and fasting blood sugar (FBS), were determined at program entry and 30 days into the intervention.

RESULTS:

Over 30 days, significant overall reductions (P<0.001) were recorded in the participants' BMI (-3.1%), systolic BP (-7.3%), diastolic BP (-4.3%), total cholesterol ([TC] -11.3%), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ([LDL-C] -12.9%), triglycerides ([TG] -8.2%), and FBS (-7.0%). Participants with the highest classifications of TC, LDL-C, TG, and FBS at program entry experienced approximately 20% reductions in these measures in 30 days.

CONCLUSIONS:

The CHIP intervention, which centres on a whole-food, plant-based eating pattern, can lead to rapid and meaningful reductions in chronic disease risk factors in the Canadian context.

PMID:
24897012
DOI:
10.3148/75.2.2014.72
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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