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J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2015 Apr;70(4):426-33. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glu060. Epub 2014 Jun 3.

GxE interactions between FOXO genotypes and drinking tea are significantly associated with prevention of cognitive decline in advanced age in China.

Author information

1
Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development and Geriatrics Division, Medical School of Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Center for Healthy Aging and Development Studies, National School of Development, Peking University, Beijing, China.
2
Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development and Geriatrics Division, Medical School of Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Business School of Xiangtan University, Hunan, China.
3
State Key Laboratory of Genetics Engineering & MOE Key Laboratory of Contemporary Anthropology, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
4
Renmin University of China, Beijing, China.
5
National University of Singapore.
6
BGI-Shenzhen, China.
7
School of Business, Nanjing University, China.
8
Department of Human Population Genetics, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Peking University, Beijing, China.
9
School of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, China.
10
Population Research Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.
11
Unit of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Biodemography, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense.
12
National Institute of Geriatrics, Beijing Hospital, Ministry of Health of China, Beijing, China.
13
BGI-Shenzhen, China. Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus University, Denmark.
14
BGI-Shenzhen, China. James D. Watson Institute of Genome Sciences, Hangzhou, China. Princess Al-Jawhara Centre of Excellence in Research of Hereditary Disorders, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
15
Center for Human Genetics, Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.
16
Department of Human Welfare, Okinawa International University, Ginowan, Japan. Department of Research, Kuakini Medical Center and Department of Geriatric Medicine, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.
17
Department of Research, Kuakini Medical Center and Department of Geriatric Medicine, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.
18
Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

Abstract

Logistic regression analysis based on data from 822 Han Chinese oldest old aged 92+ demonstrated that interactions between carrying FOXO1A-266 or FOXO3-310 or FOXO3-292 and tea drinking at around age 60 or at present time were significantly associated with lower risk of cognitive disability at advanced ages. Associations between tea drinking and reduced cognitive disability were much stronger among carriers of the genotypes of FOXO1A-266 or FOXO3-310 or FOXO3-292 compared with noncarriers, and it was reconfirmed by analysis of three-way interactions across FOXO genotypes, tea drinking at around age 60, and at present time. Based on prior findings from animal and human cell models, we postulate that intake of tea compounds may activate FOXO gene expression, which in turn may positively affect cognitive function in the oldest old population. Our empirical findings imply that the health benefits of particular nutritional interventions, including tea drinking, may, in part, depend upon individual genetic profiles.

KEYWORDS:

Cognitive disability; FOXO genotypes; GxE interactions; Oldest old.; Tea drinking

PMID:
24895270
PMCID:
PMC4447795
DOI:
10.1093/gerona/glu060
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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