Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Crit Care. 2014 Oct;29(5):885.e1-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrc.2014.04.020. Epub 2014 May 9.

Platelet indices are novel predictors of hospital mortality in intensive care unit patients.

Author information

1
Department of critical care medicine, Jinhua municipal central hospital, Zhejiang, PR China. Electronic address: zh_zhang1984@hotmail.com.
2
Department of critical care medicine, Jinhua municipal central hospital, Zhejiang, PR China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Platelet volume indices (PVIs) are inexpensive and readily available in intensive care units (ICUs). However, their association with mortality has never been investigated in a critical care setting. Our study aimed to investigate the association of PVI and mortality in unselected ICU patients.

METHODS:

This was a retrospective study conducted in a mixed 24-bed ICU from September 2010 to December 2012. Platelet indices including mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), platelet count, and plateletcrit were measured on ICU entry. Univariable analyses were performed to screen for variables that were associated with mortality. Variables with P < .1 were incorporated into a regression model to adjust for the odds ratio of platelet indices.

RESULTS:

A total of 1556 patients were included during the study period, including 1113 survivors and 443 nonsurvivors (mortality rate: 28.47%). Platelet distribution width and MPV were significantly higher in nonsurvivors than in survivors. Platelet distribution width greater than 17% and MPV greater than 11.3 fL were independent risk factors for mortality (adjusted odds ratio: 1.92 and 1.84, respectively) and survival time (hazards ratio: 1.77 and 1.75, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

Higher MPV and PDW are associated with increased risk of death, whereas the decrease in plateletcrit is associated with increased mortality risk.

KEYWORDS:

Intensive care unit; Mean platelet volume; Mortality; Platelet distribution width

PMID:
24895093
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcrc.2014.04.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center