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Phys Ther Sport. 2015 Feb;16(1):29-33. doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2014.02.005. Epub 2014 Feb 26.

Is the rearfoot pattern the most frequently foot strike pattern among recreational shod distance runners?

Author information

1
Masters Program in Physiotherapy, Universidade Cidade de São Paulo (UNICID), Rua Cesário Galeno 448, Tatuapé, CEP 03071-000, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; São Paulo Running Injury Group (SPRunIG), São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: mathewsalmeida@hotmail.com.
2
Masters Program in Physiotherapy, Universidade Cidade de São Paulo (UNICID), Rua Cesário Galeno 448, Tatuapé, CEP 03071-000, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; São Paulo Running Injury Group (SPRunIG), São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the distribution of the foot strike patterns among recreational shod runners and to compare the personal and training characteristics between runners with different foot strike patterns.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING:

Areas of running practice in São Paulo, Brazil.

PARTICIPANTS:

514 recreational shod runners older than 18 years and free of injury.

OUTCOMES MEASURES:

Foot strike patterns were evaluated with a high-speed camera (250 Hz) and photocells to assess the running speed of participants. Personal and training characteristics were collected through a questionnaire.

RESULTS:

The inter-rater reliability of the visual foot strike pattern classification method was 96.7% and intra-rater reliability was 98.9%. 95.1% (n = 489) of the participants were rearfoot strikers, 4.1% (n = 21) were midfoot strikers, and four runners (0.8%) were forefoot strikers. There were no significant differences between strike patterns for personal and training characteristics.

CONCLUSION:

This is the first study to demonstrate that almost all recreational shod runners were rearfoot strikers. The visual method of evaluation seems to be a reliable and feasible option to classify foot strike pattern.

KEYWORDS:

Biomechanics; Jogging; Running; Sports

PMID:
24894762
DOI:
10.1016/j.ptsp.2014.02.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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