Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pain Res Treat. 2014;2014:412041. doi: 10.1155/2014/412041. Epub 2014 May 6.

Pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy.

Author information

1
Department of Diabetes, Lancashire Teaching Hospital NHS Trust, Chorley and South Ribble District General Hospital, Preston Road, Chorley PR7 1PP, UK.
2
School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences and School of Forensic and Investigative Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire PR1 2HE, UK.
3
Department of Diabetes, Lancashire Teaching Hospital NHS Trust, Chorley and South Ribble District General Hospital, Preston Road, Chorley PR7 1PP, UK ; School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences and School of Forensic and Investigative Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire PR1 2HE, UK.

Abstract

The prevalence of diabetes is rising globally and, as a result, its associated complications are also rising. Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a well-known complication of diabetes and the most common cause of all neuropathic pain. About one-third of all diabetes patients suffer from PDN. It has a huge effect on a person's daily life, both physically and mentally. Despite huge advances in diabetes and neurology, the exact mechanism of pain causation in PDN is still not clear. The origin of pain could be in the peripheral nerves of the central nervous system. In this review, we discuss various possible mechanisms of the pathogenesis of pain in PDN. We discuss the role of hyperglycaemia in altering the physiology of peripheral nerves. We also describe central mechanisms of pain.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center