Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Respir Care. 2014 Jun;59(6):991-1002; discussion 1002-5. doi: 10.4187/respcare.02926.

Tracheal extubation.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas. carlos.artime@uth.tmc.edu.
2
Department of Anesthesiology, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas.

Abstract

Tracheal extubation in both the critical care and anesthesia setting is not only an important milestone for patient recovery, but also a procedure that carries a considerable risk of complication or failure. Mechanical ventilation is associated with significant complications that are time-dependent in nature, with a longer duration of intubation resulting in a higher incidence of complications, including ventilator-associated pneumonia, and increased mortality. Extubation failure and subsequent re-intubation are associated with an overall increase in the duration of mechanical ventilation, increased mortality, a greater need for tracheostomy, and higher medical costs. These risks demand that the process of extubation be managed by practitioners with a detailed understanding of the causes of extubation failure and the potential complications. A pre-established extubation plan with considerations made for the possible need for re-intubation is of the utmost importance.

KEYWORDS:

airway exchange catheters; airway management; difficult airway; extubation; laryngeal mask airway; noninvasive ventilation; ventilator weaning

PMID:
24891203
DOI:
10.4187/respcare.02926
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center