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Trends Neurosci. 2014 Jul;37(7):370-80. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2014.05.001. Epub 2014 Jun 2.

How the brainstem controls orofacial behaviors comprised of rhythmic actions.

Author information

1
Graduate Program in Neurosciences, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA; Department of Physics, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Electronic address: j_moore@alum.mit.edu.
2
Graduate Program in Neurosciences, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA; Department of Physics, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA; Section on Neurobiology, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
3
Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. Electronic address: fan.wang@duke.edu.

Abstract

Mammals perform a multitude of well-coordinated orofacial behaviors such as breathing, sniffing, chewing, licking, swallowing, vocalizing, and in rodents, whisking. The coordination of these actions must occur without fault to prevent fatal blockages of the airway. Deciphering the neuronal circuitry that controls even a single action requires understanding the integration of sensory feedback and executive commands. A far greater challenge is to understand the coordination of multiple actions. Here, we focus on brainstem circuits that drive rhythmic orofacial actions. We discuss three neural computational mechanisms that may enable circuits for different actions to operate without interfering with each other. We conclude with proposed experimental programs for delineating the neural control principles that have evolved to coordinate orofacial behaviors.

KEYWORDS:

brainstem; central pattern generator; orofacial movements; pre-Bötzinger complex; vibrissa

PMID:
24890196
PMCID:
PMC4100695
DOI:
10.1016/j.tins.2014.05.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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