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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2014 Jun;62(6):1168-73. doi: 10.1111/jgs.12842. Epub 2014 Jun 2.

An oral health study of centenarians and children of centenarians.

Author information

1
Section of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of General Dentistry, Boston University, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine whether oral health is better in centenarians than in a published birth cohort-matched sample and to compare oral health in centenarian offspring with a case-controlled reference sample.

DESIGN:

Observational cross-sectional study.

SETTING:

New England Centenarian Study (NECS).

PARTICIPANTS:

Seventy-three centenarians, 467 offspring, and 251 offspring generation-reference cohort subjects from the NECS.

MEASUREMENTS:

A self-report questionnaire was administered to measure oral health in all three groups, with edentulous rate as the primary outcome measure. The NECS made information on sociodemographic characteristics and medical history available. Centenarian results were compared with published birth cohort-matched results. Data from offspring and reference cohorts were analyzed to determine differences in oral health and associations between oral health measures and specific medical conditions.

RESULTS:

The edentulous rate of centenarians (36.5%) was lower than that of their birth cohort (46%) when they were aged 65 to 74 in 1971 to 1974 (according to National Center of Health Statistics). Adjusting for confounding factors, the reference cohort was more likely to be edentulous (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.78, 95% confidence interval CI = 1.17-6.56), less likely to have all or more than half of their own teeth (AOR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.3-0.76), and less likely to report excellent or very good oral health (AOR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.45-0.94) than the centenarian offspring.

CONCLUSION:

Centenarians and their offspring have better oral health than their respective birth cohorts. Oral health may prove to be a helpful marker for systemic health and healthy aging.

KEYWORDS:

centenarian; centenarian offspring; edentulous rate; longevity; offspring; oral health

PMID:
24889721
PMCID:
PMC4057979
DOI:
10.1111/jgs.12842
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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