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Nat Commun. 2014 Jun 2;5:3935. doi: 10.1038/ncomms4935.

Printing three-dimensional tissue analogues with decellularized extracellular matrix bioink.

Author information

1
1] Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), 77 Cheongam ro, Nam-gu, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784, South Korea [2].
2
1] Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), 77 Cheongam ro, Nam-gu, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784, South Korea [2] Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Waltham 98195, USA [3].
3
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), 77 Cheongam ro, Nam-gu, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784, South Korea.
4
1] Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-710, South Korea [2] Department of Biomedical Science, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701, South Korea.
5
Department of Plastic Surgery, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701, South Korea.
6
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Polytechnic University, 2121 Jeongwang-dong, Siheungsi, Gyeonggi-do 429-793, South Korea.
7
1] Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Waltham 98195, USA [2] Center for Cardiovascular Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, Waltham 98109, USA [3] Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.

Abstract

The ability to print and pattern all the components that make up a tissue (cells and matrix materials) in three dimensions to generate structures similar to tissues is an exciting prospect of bioprinting. However, the majority of the matrix materials used so far for bioprinting cannot represent the complexity of natural extracellular matrix (ECM) and thus are unable to reconstitute the intrinsic cellular morphologies and functions. Here, we develop a method for the bioprinting of cell-laden constructs with novel decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM) bioink capable of providing an optimized microenvironment conducive to the growth of three-dimensional structured tissue. We show the versatility and flexibility of the developed bioprinting process using tissue-specific dECM bioinks, including adipose, cartilage and heart tissues, capable of providing crucial cues for cells engraftment, survival and long-term function. We achieve high cell viability and functionality of the printed dECM structures using our bioprinting method.

Comment in

PMID:
24887553
PMCID:
PMC4059935
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms4935
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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