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PLoS One. 2014 Jun 2;9(6):e98741. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0098741. eCollection 2014.

Changes in abundance of oral microbiota associated with oral cancer.

Author information

1
Bluestone Center for Clinical Research, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York, United States of America; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York, United States of America.
2
Bioinformatics Department, Second Genome, San Bruno, California, United States of America.
3
Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America.
4
Bluestone Center for Clinical Research, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York, United States of America.
5
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Radiology and Medicine, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York, United States of America.
6
Departments of Otolaryngology and Plastic Surgery, New York University, New York, New York, United States of America.

Erratum in

  • PLoS One. 2014;9(8):e106297. Muy-Teck The [removed].

Abstract

Individual bacteria and shifts in the composition of the microbiome have been associated with human diseases including cancer. To investigate changes in the microbiome associated with oral cancers, we profiled cancers and anatomically matched contralateral normal tissue from the same patient by sequencing 16S rDNA hypervariable region amplicons. In cancer samples from both a discovery and a subsequent confirmation cohort, abundance of Firmicutes (especially Streptococcus) and Actinobacteria (especially Rothia) was significantly decreased relative to contralateral normal samples from the same patient. Significant decreases in abundance of these phyla were observed for pre-cancers, but not when comparing samples from contralateral sites (tongue and floor of mouth) from healthy individuals. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinates analysis based on 12 taxa separated most cancers from other samples with greatest separation of node positive cases. These studies begin to develop a framework for exploiting the oral microbiome for monitoring oral cancer development, progression and recurrence.

PMID:
24887397
PMCID:
PMC4041887
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0098741
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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