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Gynecol Oncol. 2014 Aug;134(2):379-84. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2014.05.021. Epub 2014 Jun 2.

Assessment of palliative care training in gynecologic oncology: a gynecologic oncology fellow research network study.

Author information

  • 1University of California Irvine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Orange, CA, United States. Electronic address: Eskander@uci.edu.
  • 2University of California Irvine, Department of Medicine, Irvine, CA, United States.
  • 3University of Minnesota, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Minneapolis, MN, United States.
  • 4Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, United States.
  • 5The Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Boston, MA, United States.
  • 6Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bronx, NY, United States.
  • 7University of Southern California Medical Center, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Los Angeles, CA, United States.
  • 8University of California Irvine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Orange, CA, United States.
  • 9The Johns Hopkins Medical Center, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baltimore, MD, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Palliative care is recognized as an important component of oncologic care. We sought to assess the quality/quantity of palliative care education in gynecologic oncology fellowship.

METHODS:

A self-administered on-line questionnaire was distributed to current gynecologic oncology fellow and candidate members during the 2013 academic year. Descriptive statistics, bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed.

RESULTS:

Of 201 fellow and candidate members, 74.1% (n=149) responded. Respondents were primarily women (75%) and white (76%). Only 11% of respondents participated in a palliative care rotation. Respondents rated the overall quality of teaching received on management of ovarian cancer significantly higher than management of patients at end of life (EOL), independent of level of training (8.25 vs. 6.23; p<0.0005). Forty-six percent reported never being observed discussing transition of care from curative to palliative with a patient, and 56% never received feedback about technique regarding discussions on EOL care. When asked to recall their most recent patient who had died, 83% reported enrollment in hospice within 4 weeks of death. Fellows reporting higher quality EOL education were significantly more likely to feel prepared to care for patients at EOL (p<0.0005). Mean ranking of preparedness increased with the number of times a fellow reported discussing changing goals from curative to palliative and the number of times he/she received feedback from an attending (p<0.0005).

CONCLUSIONS:

Gynecologic oncology fellow/candidate members reported insufficient palliative care education. Those respondents reporting higher quality EOL training felt more prepared to care for dying patients and to address complications commonly encountered in this setting.

KEYWORDS:

Education; End of life care; Fellowship training; Gynecologic cancer; Hospice; Palliative care

PMID:
24887355
PMCID:
PMC4191825
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygyno.2014.05.021
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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