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Exp Physiol. 2014 Aug;99(8):1042-52. doi: 10.1113/expphysiol.2014.079335. Epub 2014 May 30.

AGTR2 gene polymorphism is associated with muscle fibre composition, athletic status and aerobic performance.

Author information

1
Sport Technology Research Centre, Volga Region State Academy of Physical Culture, Sport and Tourism, Kazan, Russia Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Kazan State Medical University, Kazan, Russia mustafina_ld@mail.ru.
2
Research Institute for Physical-Chemical Medicine, Moscow, Russia.
3
Department of Tourism and Recreation, Academy of Physical Education and Sport, Gdansk, Poland Department of Physical Culture and Health Promotion, University of Szczecin, Szczecin, Poland.
4
Laboratory of Exercise Physiology, SSC RF Institute for Biomedical Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
5
Sports Genetics Laboratory, St Petersburg Research Institute of Physical Culture, St Petersburg, Russia.
6
St Petersburg State University, St Petersburg, Russia.
7
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Kazan State Medical University, Kazan, Russia.
8
Department of Physical Culture and Health Promotion, University of Szczecin, Szczecin, Poland.
9
Sport Technology Research Centre, Volga Region State Academy of Physical Culture, Sport and Tourism, Kazan, Russia.
10
Department of Tourism and Recreation, Academy of Physical Education and Sport, Gdansk, Poland.
11
Centre for Sports Innovation Technologies and National Teams of the Moscow Department of Physical Culture and Sport, Moscow, Russia.
12
Department of Physiology, Institute of Sport, Warsaw, Poland.
13
Sport Technology Research Centre, Volga Region State Academy of Physical Culture, Sport and Tourism, Kazan, Russia Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Kazan State Medical University, Kazan, Russia Research Institute for Physical-Chemical Medicine, Moscow, Russia Sports Genetics Laboratory, St Petersburg Research Institute of Physical Culture, St Petersburg, Russia.

Abstract

Muscle fibre type is a heritable trait and can partly predict athletic success. It has been proposed that polymorphisms of genes involved in the regulation of muscle fibre characteristics may predispose the muscle precursor cells of a given individual to be predominantly fast or slow. In the present study, we examined the association between 15 candidate gene polymorphisms and muscle fibre type composition of the vastus lateralis muscle in 55 physically active, healthy men. We found that rs11091046 C allele carriers of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor gene (AGTR2; involved in skeletal muscle development, metabolism and circulatory homeostasis) had a significantly higher percentage of slow-twitch fibres than A allele carriers [54.2 (11.1) versus 45.2 (10.2)%; P = 0.003]. These data indicate that 15.2% of the variation in muscle fibre composition of the vastus lateralis muscle can be explained by the AGTR2 genotype. Next, we investigated the frequencies of the AGTR2 alleles in 2178 Caucasian athletes and 1220 control subjects. The frequency of the AGTR2 C allele was significantly higher in male and female endurance athletes compared with power athletes (males, 62.7 versus 51.7%, P = 0.0038; females, 56.6 versus 48.1%, P = 0.0169) and control subjects (males, 62.7 versus 51.0%, P = 0.0006; elite female athletes, 65.1 versus 55.2%, P = 0.0488). Furthermore, the frequency of the AGTR2 A allele was significantly over-represented in female power athletes (51.9%) in comparison to control subjects (44.8%, P = 0.0069). We also found that relative maximal oxygen consumption was significantly greater in male endurance athletes with the AGTR2 C allele compared with AGTR2 A allele carriers [n = 28; 62.3 (4.4) versus 57.4 (6.0) ml min(-1) kg(-1); P = 0.0197]. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the AGTR2 gene C allele is associated with an increased proportion of slow-twitch muscle fibres, endurance athlete status and aerobic performance, while the A allele is associated with a higher percentage of fast-twitch fibres and power-oriented disciplines.

PMID:
24887114
DOI:
10.1113/expphysiol.2014.079335
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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