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BMC Public Health. 2014 May 29;14:525. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-525.

Stability and change in alcohol habits of different socio-demographic subgroups--a cohort study.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Widerströmska Huset, floor 8, Tomtebodav, 18 A, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. lovisa.syden@ki.se.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Stability in alcohol habits varies over time and in subgroups, but there are few longitudinal studies assessing stability in alcohol habits by socio-demographic subgroups and potential predictors of stability and change. The aim was to study stability and change in alcohol habits by sex, age, and socio-economic position (SEP).

METHODS:

Data derived from two longitudinal population based studies in Sweden; the PART study comprising 19 457 individuals aged 20-64 years in 1998-2000, and the Stockholm Public Health Cohort (SPHC) with 50 067 individuals aged 18-84 years in 2002. Both cohorts were followed-up twice; PART 2000-2003 and 2010, and SPHC 2007 and 2010. Alcohol habits were measured with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and with normal weekly alcohol consumption (NWAC). Stability in alcohol habits was measured with intraclass correlation. Odds ratios were estimated in multinomial logistic regression analysis to predict stability in alcohol habits.

RESULTS:

For the two drinking measures there were no consistent patterns of stability in alcohol habits by sex or educational level. The stability was higher for older age groups and self-employed women. To be a man aged 30-39 at baseline predicted both increase and decrease in alcohol habits.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings illustrate higher stability in alcohol habits with increasing age and among self-employed women with risky alcohol habits. To be a man and the age 30-39 predicted change in alcohol habits. No conclusive pattern of socio-economic position as predictor of change in alcohol habits was found and other studies of potential predictors seem warranted.

PMID:
24884740
PMCID:
PMC4046015
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2458-14-525
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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