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Sleep. 2014 Jun 1;37(6):1117-25. doi: 10.5665/sleep.3774.

Evaluation of a sleep education program for low-income preschool children and their families.

Author information

1
Sleep Disorders Center and Department of Neurology.
2
Center for Human Growth and Development ; Department of Health Education and Health Behavior, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
3
Department of Family and Social Medicine and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine.
4
Center for Human Growth and Development ; Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate a novel sleep education program for low-income preschool children and their families.

DESIGN:

Randomized trial of an educational intervention.

SETTING:

Community-based.

PARTICIPANTS:

Head Start preschool families (n = 152) in greater Lansing and Detroit, Michigan.

INTERVENTIONS:

Classrooms or Head Start sites were randomized to an intervention group (prompt intervention) versus a control group (delayed intervention). Parents attended a one-time, 45-min sleep education program and preschoolers received 2 w (320 total min) of classroom sleep curriculum.

MEASUREMENTS:

Parent knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and beliefs were assessed as the primary outcomes just before the 45-min sleep intervention, immediately postintervention, and approximately 1 mo postintervention. Parents reported their child's bedtimes and wake times on 7-day sleep diaries at baseline and at 1-mo follow-up. Average weeknight sleep durations and bedtimes served as secondary outcomes.

RESULTS:

Linear mixed models showed a time × treatment effect for parents' knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy (each P < 0.05) but not beliefs. These improvements were found immediately postintervention but were not retained at 1-mo follow-up. Children in the intervention group improved their weeknight sleep duration at 1-mo follow-up by 30 min (11.0 ± 0.9 h vs. 10.5 ± 1.0 hours at baseline) compared to controls (10.4 ± 0.9 h versus 10.5 ± 0.9 h at baseline) (P = 0.04 for difference between groups). Children did not show statistically significant improvements in bedtime.

CONCLUSIONS:

Educational interventions in early childhood can have an effect on parents' sleep knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy, and on children's sleep behavior. However, repeated exposure to the new information may be important for parents as well as their children.

KEYWORDS:

bedtimes; curriculum; education; health behavior; intervention; preschool children; sleep; sleep duration; socioeconomic status

PMID:
24882907
PMCID:
PMC4015386
DOI:
10.5665/sleep.3774
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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