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AIDS Care. 1989;1(3):269-80.

Sex worker, client sex behaviour and condom use in Harare, Zimbabwe.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Zimbabwe, Harare.

Abstract

One-hundred sex workers and 100 clients were interviewed at a bar/disco complex in Harare, Zimbabwe in 1989. Sociodemographic characteristics of sex workers and clients were examined. Almost a third of sex workers and nearly 90% of clients had engaged in commercial sex over 5 or more years. Sex workers reported that they worked an average of 4.6 nights a week, averaged 2.2 clients a night and charged a mean of Z$8.7 per session and Z$19.8 per night. Clients reported that they averaged 7.4 visits a month to a sex worker and paid a mean of Z$6.2 per session and Z$17.2 per night. Over half the sex workers said their last client was drunk and nearly two-thirds said he was a repeat client. Sex workers and clients were asked about the sex behaviours completed in their last paid sex act. Vaginal intercourse was reported by 98% of sex workers and clients alike. Manual stimulation of the sex worker's and client's genitalia was reported by roughly 80% of sex workers and clients. Oral and anal sex were rarely reported. Fifty-four percent of sex workers and 44% of clients reported using a condom in their last paid sex act. Client reports thus suggest that sex worker reports of sex acts and condom use with the last client possess considerable validity. Ethnographic approaches were used to study the social and work environment of sex workers. Ethnographic analysis demonstrated a lack of organisation among sex workers and a need to develop cohesive groups for successful health interventions. The study also highlighted the need to include clients in health interventions, the possible role of alcohol as an impediment to health interventions and the feasibility of using bar/disco security and the bar personnel as health educators.

PIP:

100 sex workers and 100 clients were interviewed at a bar/disco complex in Harare, Zimbabwe in 1989. Sociodemographic characteristics of sex workers and clients were examined. Almost 1/3 of sex workers and nearly 90% of clients had engaged in commercial sex over 5 or more years. Sex workers reported that they worked an average of 4.6 nights a week, averaged 2.2 clients a night and charged a means of z$8.7 per session and z$19.8 per night. Clients reported that they averaged 7.4 visits a month to a sex worker and paid a mean of z$6.2 per session and z$17.2 per night. Over 1/2 the sex workers said their last client was drunk and nearly 2.3 said he was a repeat client. Sex workers and clients were asked about the sex behaviors completed in their last paid sex act. Vaginal intercourse was reported by 98% of sex workers and clients alike. Manual stimulation of the sex worker's and client's genitalia was reported by roughly 80% of sex workers and clients. Oral and anal sex were rarely reported. 54% of sex workers and 44% of clients reported using a condom in their last paid sex act. Client reports thus suggest that sex worker reports of sex acts and condom use with the last client possess considerable validity. Ethnographic approaches were used to study the social and work environment of sex workers. Ethnographic analysis demonstrated a lack or organization among sex workers and a need to develop cohesive groups for successful health interventions. The study also highlighted the need to include clients in health interventions, the possible role of alcohol as an impediment to health interventions and the feasibility of using bar/disco security and the bar personnel as health educators. (Author's).

PMID:
2488289
DOI:
10.1080/09540128908253032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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