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Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2015 Jun;46(3):333-45. doi: 10.1007/s10578-014-0474-2.

The effects of positive and negative parenting practices on adolescent mental health outcomes in a multicultural sample of rural youth.

Author information

1
Department of Social Work, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA, smokowsk@email.unc.edu.

Abstract

The quality of parent-child relationships has a significant impact on adolescent developmental outcomes, especially mental health. Given the lack of research on rural adolescent mental health in general and rural parent-child relationships in particular, the current longitudinal study explores how rural adolescents' (N = 2,617) perceptions of parenting practices effect their mental health (i.e., anxiety, depression, aggression, self-esteem, future optimism, and school satisfaction) over a 1 year period. Regression models showed that current parenting practices (i.e., in Year 2) were strongly associated with current adolescent mental health outcomes. Negative current parenting, manifesting in parent-adolescent conflict, was related to higher adolescent anxiety, depression, and aggression and lower self-esteem, and school satisfaction. Past parent-adolescent conflict (i.e., in Year 1) also positively predicted adolescent aggression in the present. Current positive parenting (i.e., parent support, parent-child future orientation, and parent education support) was significantly associated with less depression and higher self-esteem, future optimism, and school satisfaction. Past parent education support was also related to current adolescent future optimism. Implications for practice and limitations were discussed.

PMID:
24880498
DOI:
10.1007/s10578-014-0474-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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