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Lupus. 2014 Oct;23(11):1187-91. doi: 10.1177/0961203314538108. Epub 2014 May 30.

Three cases of lupus nephritis patients with serum interleukin-32γ detection.

Author information

1
Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan shoda-tky@umin.ac.jp.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Interleukin-32 (IL-32) is an inflammatory cytokine that is associated with the pathogenesis of several connective tissue diseases. We measured serum IL-32γ concentrations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients.

METHODS:

Serum samples were obtained from SLE patients (n = 51), and healthy controls (n = 15). Serum IL-32 concentrations were measured using ELISA. Clinical information was obtained from medical records.

RESULTS:

Serum IL-32γ was detectable in three cases of SLE patients, whereas it was not detected in any healthy controls. Case 1: a 44-year-old female with lupus nephritis (LN) (Class II) and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Serum IL-32γ was 5.1 pg/ml. Case 2: a 30-year-old female with a history of diffuse proliferative LN (Class IV G (A/C)) and pulmonary hemorrhage. Serum IL-32γ was 8.9 pg/ml. Case 3: a 45-year-old female with chronic LN. Serum IL-32γ was 9.1 pg/ml. All three cases of IL-32γ-detectable patients had histories of LN and one had an active disease. In the context of LN, serum IL-32γ was detectable in 18.8% (three of 16) of SLE patients with histories of LN.

CONCLUSION:

We suppose that IL-32γ could contribute to the pathogenesis of renal diseases in some LN patients.

KEYWORDS:

Systemic lupus erythematosus; interleukin-32; lupus nephritis

PMID:
24879659
DOI:
10.1177/0961203314538108
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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