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Vet J. 2014 Jul;201(1):15-20. doi: 10.1016/j.tvjl.2014.05.008. Epub 2014 May 9.

The influence of sex hormones on seizures in dogs and humans.

Author information

  • 1Läckeby Djursjukhus, Örntorp 201, 39598 Läckeby, Sweden; Department of Small Animal Medicine and Clinical Biology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium. Electronic address: sofie.vanmeervenne@hotmail.com.
  • 2Department of Clinical Science and Services, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield AL9 7TA, UK.
  • 3Section of Clinical & Comparative Neuropathology, Ludwig Maximilians University, Veterinärstrasse. 13, D-80539 Munich, Germany.
  • 4Department of Small Animal Medicine and Clinical Biology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium.

Abstract

Epilepsy is the most common chronic neurological disorder in both humans and dogs. The effect of sex hormones on seizures is well documented in human medicine. Catamenial epilepsy is defined as an increase in frequency and severity of seizures during certain periods of the menstrual cycle. Oestradiol increases seizure activity and progesterone is believed to exhibit a protective effect. The role of androgens is controversial and there is a lack of research focusing on androgens and epilepsy. Indeed, little is known about the influence of sex hormones on epilepsy in dogs. Sterilisation is believed to improve seizure control, but no systematic research has been conducted in this field. This review provides an overview of the current literature on the influence of sex hormones on seizures in humans. The literature on idiopathic epilepsy in dogs was assessed to identify potential risk factors related to sex and sterilisation status. In general, there appears to be an over-representation of male dogs with idiopathic epilepsy but no explanation for this difference in prevalence between sexes has been reported. In addition, no reliable conclusions can be drawn on the effect of sterilisation due to the lack of focused research and robust scientific evidence.

KEYWORDS:

Canine; Epilepsy; Oestrus; Seizures; Sex hormones

PMID:
24878266
DOI:
10.1016/j.tvjl.2014.05.008
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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