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Science. 2014 May 30;344(6187):998-1001. doi: 10.1126/science.1251178.

Labor market returns to an early childhood stimulation intervention in Jamaica.

Author information

1
University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA. National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), Cambridge, MA, USA. gertler@haas.berkeley.edu.
2
University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. American Bar Foundation, Chicago, IL, USA. Institute for Fiscal Studies, University College London, London, UK.
3
University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
4
The World Bank, Washington, DC, USA.
5
The University of The West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica.
6
University College London, London, UK.

Abstract

A substantial literature shows that U.S. early childhood interventions have important long-term economic benefits. However, there is little evidence on this question for developing countries. We report substantial effects on the earnings of participants in a randomized intervention conducted in 1986-1987 that gave psychosocial stimulation to growth-stunted Jamaican toddlers. The intervention consisted of weekly visits from community health workers over a 2-year period that taught parenting skills and encouraged mothers and children to interact in ways that develop cognitive and socioemotional skills. The authors reinterviewed 105 out of 129 study participants 20 years later and found that the intervention increased earnings by 25%, enough for them to catch up to the earnings of a nonstunted comparison group identified at baseline (65 out of 84 participants).

PMID:
24876490
PMCID:
PMC4574862
DOI:
10.1126/science.1251178
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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