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Physiol Behav. 2014 Jun 22;133:197-206. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.05.021. Epub 2014 May 27.

Insulin: its role in the central control of reproduction.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Neurobiology, Institute of Zoology, Poznan University of Life Sciences, ul. Wojska Polskiego 71 C, 60-625 Poznan, Poland. Electronic address: joanna.sliwowska@gmail.com.
2
Department of Neurobiology and Anatomical Sciences, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39232, USA. Electronic address: cfergani@umc.edu.
3
Laboratory of Neurobiology, Institute of Zoology, Poznan University of Life Sciences, ul. Wojska Polskiego 71 C, 60-625 Poznan, Poland. Electronic address: mgawalek@gmail.com.
4
Department of Pediatric Diabetes and Obesity, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Szpitalna Str. 27/33, 60-572 Poznan, Poland. Electronic address: bskowron@ump.edu.pl.
5
Department of Pediatric Diabetes and Obesity, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Szpitalna Str. 27/33, 60-572 Poznan, Poland. Electronic address: pfichna@ump.edu.pl.
6
Department of Neurobiology and Anatomical Sciences, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39232, USA. Electronic address: mlehman@umc.edu.

Abstract

Insulin has long been recognized as a key regulator of energy homeostasis via its actions at the level of the brain, but in addition, plays a role in regulating neural control of reproduction. In this review, we consider and compare evidence from animal models demonstrating a role for insulin for physiological control of reproduction by effects on GnRH/LH secretion. We also review the role that insulin plays in prenatal programming of adult reproduction, and consider specific candidate neurons in the adult hypothalamus by which insulin may act to regulate reproductive function. Finally, we review clinical evidence of the role that insulin may play in adult human fertility and reproductive disorders. Overall, while insulin appears to have a significant impact on reproductive neuroendocrine function, there are many unanswered questions regarding its precise sites and mechanisms of action, and their impact on developing and adult reproductive neuroendocrine function.

KEYWORDS:

AgRP; GnRH; Hypothalamus; Insulin receptors; Kisspeptin; POMC

PMID:
24874777
PMCID:
PMC4084551
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.05.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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