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J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 May 28;106(6):dju084. doi: 10.1093/jnci/dju084. Print 2014 Jun.

Impact of lung cancer screening results on smoking cessation.

Author information

1
Affiliations of authors: Department of Health Sciences, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada (MCT); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD (CDB); Information Management Services, Rockville, MD (TLR, CRC); Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Control Program, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (KLT). martin.tammemagi@brocku.ca.
2
Affiliations of authors: Department of Health Sciences, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada (MCT); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD (CDB); Information Management Services, Rockville, MD (TLR, CRC); Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Control Program, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (KLT).

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Lung cancer screening programs may provide opportunities to reduce smoking rates among participants. This study evaluates the impact of lung cancer screening results on smoking cessation.

METHODS:

Data from Lung Screening Study participants in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST; 2002-2009) were used to prepare multivariable longitudinal regression models predicting annual smoking cessation in those who were current smokers at study entry (n = 15489, excluding those developing lung cancer in follow-up). The associations of lung cancer screening results on smoking cessation over the trial period were analyzed. All hypothesis testing used two sided P values.

RESULTS:

In adjusted analyses, smoking cessation was strongly associated with the amount of abnormality observed in the previous year's screening (P < .0001). Compared with those with a normal screen, individuals were less likely to be smokers if their previous year's screen had a major abnormality that was not suspicious for lung cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 0.811; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.722 to 0.912; P < .001), was suspicious for lung cancer but stable from previous screens (OR = 0.785; 95% CI = 0.706 to 0.872; P < .001), or was suspicious for lung cancer and was new or changed from the previous screen (OR = 0.663; 95% CI = 0.607 to 0.724; P < .001). Differences in smoking prevalence were present up to 5 years after the last screen.

CONCLUSIONS:

Smoking cessation is statistically significantly associated with screen-detected abnormality. Integration of effective smoking cessation programs within screening programs should lead to further reduction in smoking-related morbidity and mortality.

PMID:
24872540
PMCID:
PMC4081623
DOI:
10.1093/jnci/dju084
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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