Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Oct;24(5):721-6. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/cku046. Epub 2014 May 27.

Comparing sampling strategies to recruit migrants for an epidemiological study. Results from a German feasibility study.

Author information

1
1 Department of Epidemiology and International Public Health, Bielefeld School of Public Health (BiSPH), Bielefeld University, 33501 Bielefeld, Germany katharina.reiss@uni-bielefeld.de.
2
2 Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (IMIBE), University Hospital Essen, 45122 Essen, Germany 3 Institute for Medical Sociology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf, Germany.
3
4 Department of Epidemiology and Health Monitoring, Robert Koch Institute, 12101 Berlin, Germany.
4
5 German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
5
6 Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité Universitätsmedizin, 10117 Berlin, Germany.
6
2 Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (IMIBE), University Hospital Essen, 45122 Essen, Germany.
7
4 Department of Epidemiology and Health Monitoring, Robert Koch Institute, 12101 Berlin, Germany 6 Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité Universitätsmedizin, 10117 Berlin, Germany.
8
7 Department of Prevention and Evaluation, Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS GmbH, 28359 Bremen, Germany.
9
8 Institute of Public Health, University Hospital Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
10
1 Department of Epidemiology and International Public Health, Bielefeld School of Public Health (BiSPH), Bielefeld University, 33501 Bielefeld, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In 2011, almost 20.0% of the population of Germany had a migration background. Studies on their health tend to have low participation rates. The aim of our study was to compare different sampling strategies and to test different approaches to recruit migrants for an epidemiological study.

METHODS:

Four recruitment centres of the German National Cohort recruited persons of Turkish origin and ethnic German immigrants from former Soviet Union countries. A register-based (random samples from residents' registration offices) and a community-orientated strategy were applied. Participants underwent a medical examination and self-completed a questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Used approaches: The community-orientated strategies comprised the acquisition of key persons from migrant networks to support the recruitment, invitation talks and distribution of study materials in migrant settings, etc. The identifying variables in the registry data were name, nationality or country of birth. All but one centres used bilingual study material and study staff.

PARTICIPATION:

When comparing the two strategies, the register-based participation rates ranged from 10.1 to 21.0% (n = 668 participants) and the community-oriented recruitment resulted in 722 participants.

CONCLUSION:

Register-based recruitment should use a combination of name, nationality and country of birth in order not to be limited to identifying persons with a foreign nationality. However, according to the study staff, the community-oriented approach involving key persons of the same cultural background leads to a better acceptance by the participants. Also, it covers a more heterogeneous group. Yet, it is time-consuming and needs considerably more staff. Further research should establish the effectiveness of a combination of both strategies.

PMID:
24872519
DOI:
10.1093/eurpub/cku046
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center