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Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2015 Jan;47(1):20-6. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000387.

Effects of exercise and weight loss in older adults with obstructive sleep apnea.

Author information

1
1Department of Kinesiology, Towson University, Towson, MD; 2Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; 3Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore MD; and 4Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is prevalent among older individuals and is linked to increased cardiovascular disease morbidity. This study examined the change in OSA severity after exercise training and dietary-induced weight loss in older adults and the association of the changes in OSA severity, body composition, and aerobic capacity with arterial distensibility.

METHODS:

Obese adults (n = 25) with OSA, age 60 yr or older, were instructed to participate in supervised exercise (3 d·wk) and follow a calorie-restricted diet. Baseline assessments of OSA parameters, body weight and composition, aerobic capacity, and arterial distensibility were repeated at 12 wk.

RESULTS:

Nineteen participants completed the intervention. At 12 wk, there were reductions in body weight (-9%) and percentage of total body fat (-5%) and trunk fat (-8%) whereas aerobic capacity improved by 20% (all P < 0.01). The apnea-hypopnea index decreased by 10 events per hour (P < 0.01) and nocturnal SaO2 (mean SaO2) improved from 94.9% at baseline to 95.2% after intervention (P = 0.01). Arterial distensibility for the group was not different from that at baseline (P = 0.99), yet individual changes in distensibility were associated with the change in nocturnal desaturations (r = -0.49, P = 0.03) but not with the change in body weight, apnea-hypopnea index, or aerobic capacity.

CONCLUSIONS:

The severity of OSA was reduced after an exercise and weight loss program among older adults, suggesting that this lifestyle approach may be an effective first-line nonsurgical and nonpharmacological treatment for older patients with OSA.

PMID:
24870569
PMCID:
PMC4246024
DOI:
10.1249/MSS.0000000000000387
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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