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PLoS One. 2014 May 23;9(5):e98383. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0098383. eCollection 2014.

Snx14 regulates neuronal excitability, promotes synaptic transmission, and is imprinted in the brain of mice.

Author information

1
Department of Cell Biology & Physiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.
2
Division of Life Sciences, Korea University, Seoul, Korea.
3
Curriculum in Neurobiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Unites States of America.
4
Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.
5
Department of Cell Biology & Physiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America; Curriculum in Neurobiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Unites States of America; Neuroscience Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America; Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.

Abstract

Genomic imprinting describes an epigenetic process through which genes can be expressed in a parent-of-origin-specific manner. The monoallelic expression of imprinted genes renders them particularly susceptible to disease causing mutations. A large proportion of imprinted genes are expressed in the brain, but little is known about their functions. Indeed, it has proven difficult to identify cell type-specific imprinted genes due to the heterogeneity of cell types within the brain. Here we used laser capture microdissection of visual cortical neurons and found evidence that sorting nexin 14 (Snx14) is a neuronally imprinted gene in mice. SNX14 protein levels are high in the brain and progressively increase during neuronal development and maturation. Snx14 knockdown reduces intrinsic excitability and severely impairs both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. These data reveal a role for monoallelic Snx14 expression in maintaining normal neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission.

PMID:
24859318
PMCID:
PMC4032282
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0098383
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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