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Appetite. 2014 Sep;80:204-11. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2014.05.017. Epub 2014 May 21.

Effect of glycemic load on eating behavior self-efficacy during weight loss.

Author information

  • 1Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, 711 Washington St, Boston, MA 02111, USA.
  • 2Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Tufts Medical Center, 800 Washington St #268, Boston, MA 02111, USA.
  • 3Military Nutrition Division, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, 42 Kansas St, Natick, MA 01760, USA.
  • 4Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center, 800 Washington St #63, Boston, MA 02111, USA.
  • 5Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, 711 Washington St, Boston, MA 02111, USA. Electronic address: edward.saltzman@tufts.edu.

Abstract

High eating behavior self-efficacy may contribute to successful weight loss. Diet interventions that maximize eating behavior self-efficacy may therefore improve weight loss outcomes. However, data on the effect of diet composition on eating behavior self-efficacy are sparse. To determine the effects of dietary glycemic load (GL) on eating behavior self-efficacy during weight loss, body weight and eating behavior self-efficacy were measured every six months in overweight adults participating in a 12-mo randomized trial testing energy-restricted diets differing in GL. All food was provided during the first six months and self-selected thereafter. Total mean weight loss did not differ between groups, and GL-level had no significant effect on eating behavior self-efficacy. In the combined cohort, individuals losing the most weight reported improvements in eating behavior self-efficacy, whereas those achieving less weight loss reported decrements in eating behavior self-efficacy. Decrements in eating behavior self-efficacy were associated with subsequent weight regain when diets were self-selected. While GL does not appear to influence eating behavior self-efficacy, lesser amounts of weight loss on provided-food energy restricted diets may deter successful maintenance of weight loss by attenuating improvements in eating behavior self-efficacy.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00099099.

KEYWORDS:

Energy restriction; Glycemic index; Weight maintenance; Weight regain; Weight self-efficacy

PMID:
24859114
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2014.05.017
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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