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Res Dev Disabil. 2014 Sep;35(9):1927-33. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2014.04.018. Epub 2014 May 21.

Bone quality in older adults with intellectual disabilities.

Author information

1
Intellectual Disability Medicine, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Ipse de Bruggen, P.O. Box 2027, 2470 AA Zwammerdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: l.bastiaanse@erasmusmc.nl.
2
Intellectual Disability Medicine, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands; ASVZ, Medical Department, Care and Service Centre for People with Intellectual Disabilities, P.O. Box 121, 3360 AC Sliedrecht, The Netherlands.
3
Intellectual Disability Medicine, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Although osteoporosis is a progressive bone disease leading to increased risk of fracture, it has rarely been investigated on a large scale in older people with intellectual disabilities (ID). In this study, 768 persons with ID (aged ≥ 50 years) were measured with quantitative ultrasound to determine the prevalence of low bone quality. The association of low bone quality with patient characteristics, mobility, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), prior fractures, anticonvulsant drug use, intake of calcium, and vitamin D3 levels was also investigated. The prevalence of low bone quality was 43.9%. Low bone quality was positively associated with female gender, age, more severe level of ID, mobility impairment, and anticonvulsant drug use, and negatively with BMI. In clinical practice, people with ID who are at risk for low bone quality should periodically be screened for osteoporosis and be given advice about nutritional supplements and appropriate lifestyle.

KEYWORDS:

Associations; Bone quality; Intellectual disability; Older people; Osteoporosis; Prevalence

PMID:
24858785
DOI:
10.1016/j.ridd.2014.04.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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