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Trends Immunol. 2014 Jul;35(7):319-31. doi: 10.1016/j.it.2014.04.005. Epub 2014 May 21.

Studying the antibody repertoire after vaccination: practical applications.

Author information

1
Oxford Vaccine Group, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford and the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, Oxford, UK. Electronic address: jacob.galson@paediatrics.ox.ac.uk.
2
Oxford Vaccine Group, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford and the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, Oxford, UK. Electronic address: andrew.pollard@paediatrics.ox.ac.uk.
3
Oxford Vaccine Group, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford and the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, Oxford, UK.

Abstract

Nearly all licensed vaccines have been developed to confer protection against infectious diseases by stimulating the production of antibodies by B cells, but the nature of a successful antibody response has been difficult to capture. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology have allowed high-resolution characterization of the antibody repertoire, and of the changes that occur following vaccination. These approaches have yielded important insights into the B cell response, and have raised the possibility of using specific antibody sequences as measures of vaccine immunogenicity. Here, we review recent findings based on antibody repertoire sequencing, and discuss potential applications of these new technologies and of the analyses of the increasing volume of antibody sequence data in the context of vaccine development.

KEYWORDS:

B cell receptor repertoire; VDJ; antibody repertoire; immunoglobulin repertoire; next generation sequencing; vaccination

PMID:
24856924
DOI:
10.1016/j.it.2014.04.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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