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Fertil Steril. 2014 Aug;102(2):530-8. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2014.04.021. Epub 2014 May 23.

Effects of work and life stress on semen quality.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Rutgers School of Public Health, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Electronic address: teresa.janevic@rutgers.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York.
3
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Downstate Medical Center, State University of New York, Brooklyn, New York.
4
Child Health and Development Studies, Center for Research on Women's and Children's Health, Public Health Institute, Berkeley, California.
5
Department of Biostatistics, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate associations between work-related stress, stressful life events, and perceived stress and semen quality.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional analysis.

SETTING:

Northern California.

PATIENT(S):

193 men from the Child Health and Development Studies evaluated between 2005-2008.

INTERVENTION(S):

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Measures of stress including job strain, perceived stress, and stressful life events; outcome measures of sperm concentration, percentage of motile sperm, and percentage of morphologically normal sperm.

RESULT(S):

We found an inverse association between perceived stress score and sperm concentration (estimated coefficient b=-0.09×10(3)/mL; 95% confidence interval [CI]=-0.18, -0.01), motility (b=-0.39; 95% CI=-0.79, 0.01), and morphology (b=-0.14; 95% CI, -0.25, -0.04) in covariate-adjusted linear regression analyses. Men who experienced two or more stressful life events in the past year compared with no stressful events had a lower percentage of motile sperm (b=-8.22; 95% CI, -14.31, -2.13) and a lower percentage of morphologically normal sperm (b=-1.66; 95% CI, -3.35, 0.03) but a similar sperm concentration. Job strain was not associated with semen parameters.

CONCLUSION(S):

In this first study to examine all three domains of stress, perceived stress and stressful life events but not work-related stress were associated with semen quality.

KEYWORDS:

Semen quality; stress; work

PMID:
24856463
PMCID:
PMC4382866
DOI:
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2014.04.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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