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Neuron. 2014 May 21;82(4):908-24. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.04.004.

Dendritic spikes induce ripples in parvalbumin interneurons during hippocampal sharp waves.

Author information

1
Two-Photon Imaging Center, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest 1083, Hungary; Faculty of Information Technology and Bionics, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Budapest 1083, Hungary.
2
Two-Photon Imaging Center, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest 1083, Hungary; Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
3
Two-Photon Imaging Center, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest 1083, Hungary.
4
Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest 1111, Hungary.
5
Faculty of Information Technology and Bionics, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Budapest 1083, Hungary; Laboratory of Cerebral Cortex Research, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest 1083, Hungary.
6
Transgenic Facility, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest 1083, Hungary.
7
Two-Photon Imaging Center, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest 1083, Hungary; Faculty of Information Technology and Bionics, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Budapest 1083, Hungary. Electronic address: rozsabal@koki.hu.

Erratum in

  • Neuron. 2014 Aug 6;83(3):749.

Abstract

Sharp-wave ripples are transient oscillatory events in the hippocampus that are associated with the reactivation of neuronal ensembles within specific circuits during memory formation. Fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (FS-PV INs) are thought to provide fast integration in these oscillatory circuits by suppressing regenerative activity in their dendrites. Here, using fast 3D two-photon imaging and a caged glutamate, we challenge this classical view by demonstrating that FS-PV IN dendrites can generate propagating Ca(2+) spikes during sharp-wave ripples. The spikes originate from dendritic hot spots and are mediated dominantly by L-type Ca(2+) channels. Notably, Ca(2+) spikes were associated with intrinsically generated membrane potential oscillations. These oscillations required the activation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, had the same frequency as the field potential oscillations associated with sharp-wave ripples, and controlled the phase of action potentials. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the smallest functional unit that can generate ripple-frequency oscillations is a segment of a dendrite.

PMID:
24853946
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2014.04.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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