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Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 2014 Aug;53:77-88. doi: 10.1016/j.biocel.2014.05.016. Epub 2014 May 19.

C-reactive protein and lung diseases.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Electronic address: agassandianm@upmc.edu.
2
Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
3
Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Abstract

C-reactive protein (CRP), a member of the pentraxin family of plasma proteins, is one of the most distinctive acute phase reactants. In response to inflammation, cell damage or tissue injury, plasma level of CRP rapidly and dramatically increases up to 1000-fold, a phenomenon that has been used for years to monitor infections and many destructive/inflammatory conditions. The magnitude of CRP increase usually correlates with the severity of injury or inflammation and reflects an important physiological role of this interesting but still under-investigated protein. It is now generally accepted that CRP is involved in host defense and inflammation. However, the exact function of this protein in health and disease remains unclear. Many studies have demonstrated that in different pathophysiological conditions CRP might be involved in the regulation of lung function and may participate in the pathogenesis of various pulmonary disorders. The fluctuation of CRP concentrations in both alveolar fluid and serum associated with different pulmonary diseases suggests its important role in lung biology. Discussion of the still controversial functions of CRP in lung physiology and diseases is the main focus of this review.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma; COPD; CRP; Inflammation; Lung cancer

PMID:
24853773
DOI:
10.1016/j.biocel.2014.05.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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