Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Food Prot. 2014 Jun;77(6):927-33. doi: 10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-13-497.

inhibitory effects of citral, cinnamaldehyde, and tea polyphenols on mixed biofilm formation by foodborne Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enteritidis.

Author information

1
Department Biological Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center100, Guangzhou 510006, People's Republic of China. emhongmeizhang@163.com.
2
Department Biological Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center100, Guangzhou 510006, People's Republic of China.
3
College of Light Industry and Food Sciences, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

Biofilms are significant hazards in the food industry. In this study, we investigated the effects of food additive such as citral, cinnamaldehyde, and tea polyphenols on mixed biofilm formation by foodborne Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella serotype Enteritidis. The adhesion rates of mixed strains in sub-MIC of additives were determined by a microtiter plate assay and bacterial communication signal autoinducer 2 (AI-2) production via a bioluminescence reporter Vibrio harveyi BB170. The structure of mixed biofilm was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The effect of the disinfectants hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite, and peracetic acid was tested on the mixed biofilm. Our results demonstrated that citral, cinnamaldehyde, and tea polyphenols were able to significantly inhibit mixed biofilm formation, while citral could reduce the synthesis of AI-2. Conversely, we observed a significant increase in AI-2 mediated by cinnamaldehyde. Tea polyphenols at lower concentrations induced AI-2 synthesis; however, AI-2 synthesis was significantly inhibited at higher concentrations (300 m g/ml). Food additives inhibited the adhesion of mixed bacteria on stainless steel chips and increased the sensitivity of the mixed biofilm to disinfectants. In conclusion, citral, cinnamaldehyde, and tea polyphenols had strong inhibitory effects on mixed biofilm formation and also enhanced the effect of disinfectant on mixed biofilm formation. This study provides a scientific basis for the application of natural food additives to control biofilm formation of foodborne bacteria.

PMID:
24853514
DOI:
10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-13-497
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center