Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Behav Med. 2015 Jun;22(3):283-91. doi: 10.1007/s12529-014-9417-3.

Enhancing dissemination and implementation research using systems science methods.

Author information

1
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 15260, USA, jgburke@pitt.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Dissemination and implementation (D&I) research seeks to understand and overcome barriers to adoption of behavioral interventions that address complex problems, specifically interventions that arise from multiple interacting influences crossing socio-ecological levels. It is often difficult for research to accurately represent and address the complexities of the real world, and traditional methodological approaches are generally inadequate for this task. Systems science methods, expressly designed to study complex systems, can be effectively employed for an improved understanding about dissemination and implementation of evidence-based interventions.

PURPOSE:

The aims of this study were to understand the complex factors influencing successful D&I of programs in community settings and to identify D&I challenges imposed by system complexity.

METHOD:

Case examples of three systems science methods-system dynamics modeling, agent-based modeling, and network analysis-are used to illustrate how each method can be used to address D&I challenges.

RESULTS:

The case studies feature relevant behavioral topical areas: chronic disease prevention, community violence prevention, and educational intervention. To emphasize consistency with D&I priorities, the discussion of the value of each method is framed around the elements of the established Reach Effectiveness Adoption Implementation Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework.

CONCLUSION:

Systems science methods can help researchers, public health decision makers, and program implementers to understand the complex factors influencing successful D&I of programs in community settings and to identify D&I challenges imposed by system complexity.

PMID:
24852184
PMCID:
PMC4363012
DOI:
10.1007/s12529-014-9417-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center