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J Med Assoc Thai. 2013 Dec;96 Suppl 5:S25-32.

Effect of oat consumption on lipid profiles in hypercholesterolemic adults.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hypercholesterolemia is a strong risk factor in cardiovascular disease. Oat (Avena sativa L.) beta-glucan, the soluble fiber in oat, has been known to reduce blood cholesterol levels considerably. However, the effect of oat soluble fiber in the Thai population is unknown.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effect of oat consumption on serum lipid profiles in Thai hypercholesterolemic adults.

MATERIAL AND METHOD:

The present study was a randomized, crossover design. Twenty-four hypercholesterolemic adults, male and female aged 30-60 years, were randomly assigned into two groups of twelve each. Group 1 consumed 70 g (3 g beta-glucan) of oatmeal daily through the first 4-week intervention, and then switched to 70 g rice porridge (control product) daily for the next 4-week intervention. Group 2 consumed rice porridge first and then oatmeal. Before and after each intervention period, lipid profiles including total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) of all subjects were measured.

RESULTS:

Following daily oat consumption, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels were significantly lower than baseline levels and lower than the levels observed with rice consumption. Oat consumption reduced total cholesterol by 5% and LDL-cholesterol by 10% from baseline levels. In addition, mean and percent changes were significantly different from the levels after consuming rice porridge (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Oatmeal reduced serum total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels in hypercholesterolemic Thai adults. Hence, oat consumption is a reasonable recommendation for Thai individuals with hyperlipidemia.

PMID:
24851570
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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