Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Elife. 2014 May 21;3:e01817. doi: 10.7554/eLife.01817.

Local cell interactions and self-amplifying individual cell ingression drive amniote gastrulation.

Author information

1
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London, United Kingdom ogv20@cam.ac.uk.
2
Division of Pediatric Surgery, Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York-Presbyterian, New York, United States Department of Surgery, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, United States.
3
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
4
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London, United Kingdom c.stern@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Gastrulation generates three layers of cells (ectoderm, mesoderm, endoderm) from a single sheet, while large scale cell movements occur across the entire embryo. In amniote (reptiles, birds, mammals) embryos, the deep layers arise by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) at a morphologically stable midline structure, the primitive streak (PS). We know very little about how these events are controlled or how the PS is maintained despite its continuously changing cellular composition. Using the chick, we show that isolated EMT events and ingression of individual cells start well before gastrulation. A Nodal-dependent 'community effect' then concentrates and amplifies EMT by positive feedback to form the PS as a zone of massive cell ingression. Computer simulations show that a combination of local cell interactions (EMT and cell intercalation) is sufficient to explain PS formation and the associated complex movements globally across a large epithelial sheet, without the need to invoke long-range signalling.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01817.001.

KEYWORDS:

EMT; cell movements; computer simulation; epithelial–mesenchymal interactions; modelling; primitive streak

PMID:
24850665
PMCID:
PMC4029171
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.01817
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center