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DNA Res. 2014 Oct;21(5):469-80. doi: 10.1093/dnares/dsu013. Epub 2014 May 19.

Multiple omics uncovers host-gut microbial mutualism during prebiotic fructooligosaccharide supplementation.

Author information

1
Laboratory for Intestinal Ecosystem, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS), 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan.
2
Laboratory for Intestinal Ecosystem, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS), 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Yamagata 997-0052, Japan.
3
Center for Omics and Bioinformatics, Department of Computational Biology, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561, Japan.
4
Graduate School of Medical Life Science, Yokohama City University, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan Environmental Metabolic Analysis Research Team, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan.
5
Laboratory for Intestinal Ecosystem, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS), 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan Graduate School of Medical Life Science, Yokohama City University, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan ohno@rcai.riken.jp.

Abstract

Fructooligosaccharide (FOS), a prebiotic well known for its health-promoting properties, can improve the human gut ecosystem most likely through changes in its microbial composition. However, the detailed mechanism(s) of action of FOS in the modulation of the gut ecosystem remain(s) obscure. Traditional methods of profiling microbes and metabolites could barely show any significant features due to the existence of large interindividual differences, but our novel microbe-metabolite correlation approach, combined with faecal immunoglobulin A (IgA) measurements, has revealed that the induction of mucosal IgA by FOS supplementation correlated with the presence of specific bacteria. Furthermore, the metabolic dynamics of butyrate, L-phenylalanine, L-lysine and tyramine were positively correlated with that of these bacteria and IgA production, whereas p-cresol was negatively correlated. Taken together, our focused intraindividual analysis with omics approaches is a powerful strategy for uncovering the gut molecular network and could provide a new vista for understanding the human gut ecosystem.

KEYWORDS:

commensal microbiota; correlation analysis; gut ecosystem; metabolite; prebiotics

PMID:
24848698
PMCID:
PMC4195493
DOI:
10.1093/dnares/dsu013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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