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Neuroimage. 2014 Oct 1;99:50-8. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.05.022. Epub 2014 May 17.

Off-line consolidation of motor sequence learning results in greater integration within a cortico-striatal functional network.

Author information

1
Functional Neuroimaging Unit, Centre de recherche de l'institut gériatrique de l'université de Montréal, Québec, Canada; Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, Québec, Canada.
2
Functional Neuroimaging Unit, Centre de recherche de l'institut gériatrique de l'université de Montréal, Québec, Canada; Centre d'étude du sommeil et des rythmes biologiques, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, Québec, Canada; Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, Québec, Canada.
3
Functional Neuroimaging Unit, Centre de recherche de l'institut gériatrique de l'université de Montréal, Québec, Canada; Unité Mixte de Recherche-S 678, INSERM/University, Paris VI, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France.
4
Functional Neuroimaging Unit, Centre de recherche de l'institut gériatrique de l'université de Montréal, Québec, Canada.
5
Laboratory for Functional Brain Imaging and Learning Research, The Brain-Behavior Center, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
6
Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, NIMH, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
7
Unité Mixte de Recherche-S 678, INSERM/University, Paris VI, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France.
8
Functional Neuroimaging Unit, Centre de recherche de l'institut gériatrique de l'université de Montréal, Québec, Canada; Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, Québec, Canada; Unité Mixte de Recherche-S 678, INSERM/University, Paris VI, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France. Electronic address: julien.doyon@umontreal.ca.

Abstract

The consolidation of motor sequence learning is known to depend on sleep. Work in our laboratory and others have shown that the striatum is associated with this off-line consolidation process. In this study, we aimed to quantify the sleep-dependent dynamic changes occurring at the network level using a measure of functional integration. We directly compared changes in connectivity before and after sleep or the simple passage of daytime. As predicted, the results revealed greater integration within the cortico-striatal network after sleep, but not an equivalent daytime period. Importantly, a similar pattern of results was also observed using a data-driven approach; the increase in integration being specific to a cortico-striatal network, but not to other known functional networks. These findings reveal, for the first time, a new signature of motor sequence consolidation: a greater between-regions interaction within the cortico-striatal system.

KEYWORDS:

Consolidation; Functional connectivity; Motor learning; Networks; Sleep; fMRI

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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