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Surg Neurol Int. 2014 Apr 16;5(Suppl 3):S133-7. doi: 10.4103/2152-7806.130670. eCollection 2014.

Clinical results of cervical laminectomy and fusion for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy in 58 consecutive patients.

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1
Department of Neurosurgery, David Geffen UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, USA.
2
Department of Neurosurgery, David Geffen UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, USA ; Department of Orthopaedics, David Geffen UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There are a number of surgical treatment options for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). In this study, the authors present their clinical results with cervical laminectomy and fusion for the treatment of patients with CSM.

METHODS:

This retrospective study included 58 consecutive patients who underwent cervical laminectomy and fusion for CSM. There were 38 males and 20 females, with a mean age of 64 (range 42-92) years. The Japanese orthopedic association score (mJOA) scale was used as the functional outcome measurement. Both the absolute increase in mJOA and the neurological recovery rate of mJOA were analyzed. The mean clinical follow-up was 17 months (range 5-52 months).

RESULTS:

There was a statistically significant improvement between mean preoperative (13.2, range 7-17) and postoperative (16.1, range 11-18) mJOA scores following surgery. The average improvement in mJOA score was 2.9 points. The mean neurological recovery rate was 56.6%. Overall 85.5% of patients improved with surgery (n = 51) and the remaining 14.5% of patients had no change in their mJOA score after surgery (n = 7). Fusion was documented in all 58 patients. There was a 10.3% overall complication rate (n = 6). The most common complications were C5 nerve palsies which occurred in 6.9% of the cohort (n = 4); all completely resolved.

CONCLUSION:

Cervical laminectomy and fusion is a safe and efficacious procedure for the treatment of CSM. The clinical outcomes appear to be quite reproducible, and this technique is an important part of a spine surgeon's armamentarium.

KEYWORDS:

Cervical; fusion; laminectomy; myelopathy

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