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Mult Scler. 2014 Dec;20(14):1833-40. doi: 10.1177/1352458514533843. Epub 2014 May 19.

Antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus and MRI disease activity in multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Norwegian MS Competence Centre, Haukeland University Hospital, Jonas Lies vei 65, 5053 Bergen, Norway silje.agnethe.stokke@helse-bergen.no.
2
Norwegian MS Competence Centre, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway/KG Jebsen Center for MS Research, University of Bergen, Norway/Norwegian MS Registry and Biobank, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway.
3
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway/Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
4
Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
5
MS Centre Hakadal, Norway.
6
St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway/Children's and Women's Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
7
St Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway.
8
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway/Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway.
9
Curato Oslo, Norway.
10
Molde Hospital, Norway/Unit for Applied Clinical Research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
11
Haukeland University Hospital, Norway.
12
Unilabs Drammen, Norway.
13
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway/Helse Sør-Øst Health Services Research Centre, Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
14
Norwegian MS Competence Centre, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway/KG Jebsen Center for MS Research, University of Bergen, Norway.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous reports indicate an association between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody levels and multiple sclerosis (MS) disease activity, but the results have been conflicting.

OBJECTIVES:

The objective of this paper is to study if EBV antibody levels reflect MRI disease activity in MS and examine the potential for EBV antibody levels as biomarkers for treatment response.

METHODS:

A total of 87 MS patients were followed for two years prior to and during interferon beta (IFNB) treatment, with MRI examinations and serum measurement of IgM and IgG antibodies to viral capsid antigen (VCA), EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) and early antigen (EA). Associations between EBV antibody levels and MRI activity were assessed by a logistic regression model.

RESULTS:

Higher anti-EBNA-1 IgG levels were associated with increased MRI activity, OR = 2.95 (95% CI 1.07-8.10; p = 0.036) for combined unique activity (CUA; the sum of T1Gd+ lesions and new or enlarging T2 lesions). Although most patients were anti-VCA IgM negative, there was an inverse association, OR = 0.32 (95% CI 0.12-0.84; p = 0.021) with CUA during IFNB treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study supports an association between anti-EBNA-1 IgG levels and MS disease activity. We also found an inverse association with anti-VCA IgM levels during IFNB treatment not previously described, indicating anti-VCA IgM as a possible biomarker for IFNB treatment response.

KEYWORDS:

MRI; Multiple sclerosis; interferon beta; relapsing–remitting

PMID:
24842958
DOI:
10.1177/1352458514533843
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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