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Am J Prev Med. 2014 Jun;46(6):617-23. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.01.020.

Cervical cancer screening with AMIGAS: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: david.r.lairson@uth.tmc.edu.
2
School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas.
3
Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas.
4
CDC, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Atlanta, Georgia.
5
School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas; Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas.
6
Epidemiology and Analysis Program Office, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hispanic women have a higher incidence of cervical cancer than all other races and ethnicities. In Hispanic subgroups, Mexican American women were among the least likely to have received cervical cancer screening. In a recent RCT, Ayudando a las Mujeres con Información, Guia, y Amor para su Salud (AMIGAS) was shown to increase cervical cancer screening rates among women of Mexican descent at 6 months in all intervention arms compared to the control arm. Limited information exists about the economics of interventions to increase cervical cancer screening rates among women of Mexican descent.

PURPOSE:

This study aims to estimate the cost-effectiveness of the alternative AMIGAS intervention methods for increasing cervical cancer screening among low-income women of Mexican descent in three U.S. communities.

METHODS:

Cost data were collected from 2008 to 2011 alongside the AMIGAS study of 613 women. Receipt of Pap test within 6 months of intervention was the primary outcome measure in the cost-effectiveness analysis, conducted during 2012-2013.

RESULTS:

The cost per additional woman screened comparing the video-only intervention to usual care was $980. The cost increased to $1,309 with participant time cost included. With an additional cost per participant of $3.90 compared to flipchart only, the full AMIGAS program (video plus flipchart) yielded 6.8% additional women screened.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results on the average and incremental cost-effectiveness of the AMIGAS program elements may assist health policymakers and program managers to select and appropriately budget for interventions shown to increase cervical cancer screening among low-income women of Mexican descent.

PMID:
24842738
PMCID:
PMC4603553
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2014.01.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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