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FEBS Lett. 2014 Nov 17;588(22):4158-66. doi: 10.1016/j.febslet.2014.05.007. Epub 2014 May 17.

Epithelial CaSR deficiency alters intestinal integrity and promotes proinflammatory immune responses.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32607, USA.
2
Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32608, USA; Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA.
3
Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA.
4
Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA.
5
Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32608, USA; Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA. Electronic address: m.zadeh@ufl.edu.

Abstract

The intestinal epithelium is equipped with sensing receptor mechanisms that interact with luminal microorganisms and nutrients to regulate barrier function and gut immune responses, thereby maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Herein, we clarify the role of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) using intestinal epithelium-specific Casr(-/-) mice. Epithelial CaSR deficiency diminished intestinal barrier function, altered microbiota composition, and skewed immune responses towards proinflammatory. Consequently, Casr(-/-) mice were significantly more prone to chemically induced intestinal inflammation resulting in colitis. Accordingly, CaSR represents a potential therapeutic target for autoinflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Calcium-sensing receptor; Colitis; Epithelial cell; Gut microbiota; Inflammation; Intestinal barrier function

PMID:
24842610
PMCID:
PMC4234694
DOI:
10.1016/j.febslet.2014.05.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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