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Am J Clin Pathol. 2014 Jun;141(6):884-91. doi: 10.1309/AJCPXQD0NSJNK0CX.

Assessment of nuclear nanomorphology marker to improve the detection of malignancy from bile duct biopsy specimens.

Author information

1
From the Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA; hartmandj@upmc.edu.
2
Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA;
3
Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; and.
4
Department of Gastroenterology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The accurate diagnosis of malignancy from small bile duct biopsy specimens is often challenging. This proof-of-concept study assessed the feasibility of a novel optical technology, spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy (SL-QPM), that assesses nanoscale structural alterations in epithelial nuclei for improving the diagnosis of malignancy in bile duct biopsy specimens.

METHODS:

The SL-QPM analysis was performed on standard histology specimens of bile duct biopsy specimens from 45 patients. We analyzed normal cells with benign follow-up, histologically normal cells with pancreaticobiliary malignancy, and malignant epithelial cells.

RESULTS:

The SL-QPM-derived nuclear nanomorphology marker can not only distinguish benign and malignant epithelial cells but can also detect features of malignancy in those cells normal by light microscopy with a discriminatory accuracy of 0.90. When combining pathology with SL-QPM, the sensitivity is improved to 88.5% from 65.4% of conventional pathology, while maintaining 100% specificity.

CONCLUSIONS:

SL-QPM-derived nuclear nanomorphology markers represent a novel approach for detecting malignancy from histologically normal-appearing epithelial cells, with potential as an adjunctive test in patients with negative or inconclusive pathologic diagnosis on bile duct biopsy specimens.

KEYWORDS:

Gastrointestinal; Molecular diagnostics; Technique

PMID:
24838334
PMCID:
PMC4131989
DOI:
10.1309/AJCPXQD0NSJNK0CX
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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