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J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2014 Sep;25(9):1398-404. doi: 10.1016/j.jvir.2014.03.027. Epub 2014 May 14.

Thoracic duct embolization and disruption for treatment of chylous effusions: experience with 105 patients.

Author information

1
Division of Angiography and Interventional Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis St., Boston MA 02115. Electronic address: vishwan_pamarthi@hms.harvard.edu.
2
Division of Angiography and Interventional Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis St., Boston MA 02115.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To review the indications, technical approach, and clinical outcomes of thoracic duct embolization (TDE) and thoracic duct disruption (TDD) in patients with symptomatic chylous effusions.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A total of 105 patients who underwent 120 consecutive TDE/TDD procedures were retrospectively reviewed. Data including cause of effusion, procedural technique, and pre- and postprocedural effusion volume were analyzed. Technical and clinical success were evaluated for each procedure, with technical success defined as successful interruption of the thoracic duct by embolization or needle disruption and clinical success defined as resolution of effusion without surgical intervention.

RESULTS:

The technical success rate was 79% (95 of 120); 53 TDEs were performed, resulting in a 72% clinical success rate (n = 38), whereas 42 TDDs showed a 55% clinical success rate (n = 23; P = .13). Procedures to treat postpneumonectomy chylous effusions had a success rate of 82% (14 of 17), compared with 47% (nine of 19) in postpleurectomy subjects (P < .05). Clinically successful cases had lower 24-, 48-, and 72-hour postprocedural effusion volumes versus clinically unsuccessful cases (P < .05), as well as greater rates of reduction in effusion volume at these time points (P < .05). Clinical success rate in subjects with traumatic effusions was higher than in subjects with nontraumatic effusions (62% [60 of 97] vs 13% [one of eight]; P < .05), and 6.7% of subjects (n = 7) experienced minor complications.

CONCLUSIONS:

TDE and TDD are safe and effective minimally invasive treatments for traumatic thoracic duct injuries. In the present series, factors affecting procedural success included etiology of effusion, postprocedural effusion volume, and rate of postprocedural effusion volume reduction.

Comment in

PMID:
24837980
DOI:
10.1016/j.jvir.2014.03.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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