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Mayo Clin Proc. 2014 Jul;89(7):926-33. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2014.04.003. Epub 2014 May 14.

Remission of disseminated cancer after systemic oncolytic virotherapy.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
2
Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
3
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
4
Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
5
Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
6
Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
7
Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Electronic address: Dispenzieri.angela@mayo.edu.

Abstract

MV-NIS is an engineered measles virus that is selectively destructive to myeloma plasma cells and can be monitored by noninvasive radioiodine imaging of NIS gene expression. Two measles-seronegative patients with relapsing drug-refractory myeloma and multiple glucose-avid plasmacytomas were treated by intravenous infusion of 10(11) TCID50 (50% tissue culture infectious dose) infectious units of MV-NIS. Both patients responded to therapy with M protein reduction and resolution of bone marrow plasmacytosis. Further, one patient experienced durable complete remission at all disease sites. Tumor targeting was clearly documented by NIS-mediated radioiodine uptake in virus-infected plasmacytomas. Toxicities resolved within the first week after therapy. Oncolytic viruses offer a promising new modality for the targeted infection and destruction of disseminated cancer.

PMID:
24835528
PMCID:
PMC4225126
DOI:
10.1016/j.mayocp.2014.04.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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