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Food Chem Toxicol. 2014 Aug;70:107-13. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2014.04.037. Epub 2014 May 13.

Inhibitory effect of Raphanobrassica on Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 545-8585, Japan.
2
Division of Pathology, National Institute of Health Sciences, Tokyo 158-8501, Japan.
3
Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 545-8585, Japan. Electronic address: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp.

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with chronic gastritis and also development of gastric cancer. Raphanobrassica (RB) is an intergeneric hybrid of the genera Raphanus (radish) and Brassica (cabbages) containing appreciable amounts of glucoraphanin (GR) and glucoraphenin (GRe), which are actively hydrolyzed by the enzyme myrosinase to sulforaphane and sulforaphene, respectively. Both of these metabolites exert antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of two freeze-dried products of RB (RB1 and RB2) on H. pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils. Six-week-old male Mongolian gerbils were inoculated orally with H. pylori (ATCC 43504), and 2weeks later were fed diets containing no additives or diets supplemented with 2% RB1 (containing both GR and GRe) or 2% RB2 (containing GR only) for 10weeks. In the RB1, but not the RB2 group, mononuclear cell infiltration, mRNA expression of IL-6, and cell proliferation in the gastric mucosa were significantly suppressed. These results indicate that RB1 containing both GR and GRe exerted significant inhibitory effects on H. pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils apparently mediated via suppression of IL-6 expression and chronic inflammation.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic gastritis; Gastric carcinogenesis; Helicobacter pylori; Inhibition of inflammation; Mongolian gerbils; Raphanobrassica

PMID:
24835035
DOI:
10.1016/j.fct.2014.04.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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