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Mult Scler Int. 2014;2014:539854. doi: 10.1155/2014/539854. Epub 2014 Apr 14.

Comparison of Antioxidant Status and Vitamin D Levels between Multiple Sclerosis Patients and Healthy Matched Subjects.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Tehran, Iran.
2
Department of Nutrition, School of Para Medicine, Diabetes Research Center, Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz 61357-15794, Iran.
3
Department of Neurology, Golestan Hospital, Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.
4
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.

Abstract

Objective. The aim of the present study was to compare the serum levels of total antioxidant status (TAS) and 25(OH) D3 and dietary intake of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with those of normal subjects. Method. Thirty-seven MS patients (31 women) and the same number of healthy matched controls were compared for their serum levels and dietary intake of 25(OH) D3 and TAS. Sun exposure and the intake of antioxidants and vitamin D rich foods were estimated through face-to-face interview and food frequency questionnaire. Results. Dietary intake of antioxidants and vitamin D rich foods, vitamin C, vitamin A, and folate was not significantly different between the two groups. There were also no significant differences in the mean levels of 25(OH) D3 and TAS between the study groups. Both groups had low serum levels of 25(OH) D3 and total antioxidants. Conclusion. No significant differences were detected in serum levels and dietary intake of vitamin D and antioxidants between MS patients and healthy controls. All subjects had low antioxidant status and vitamin D levels.

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