Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Gastroenterol Hepatol Bed Bench. 2011 Summer;4(3):138-41.

Irritable bowel syndrome in women undergoing hysterectomy and tubular ligation.

Author information

1
Liver and Gastrointestinal Diseases Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
2
Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
3
Ahwaz Jondishapour University of Medical Sciences, Ahwaz, Iran.
4
Biostatistics Department, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

AIM:

The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of irritable bowel syndrome in women undergoing hysterectomy and tubular ligation.

BACKGROUND:

The results of previous studies have shown an increased incidence of irritable bowel syndrome after gynecological surgeries.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Participants were patients of Alzahra and Taleghani University hospitals in Tabriz. One hundred and seventy two women without gastrointestinal symptoms or a diagnosis of the irritable bowel syndrome underwent tubular ligation and 164 women underwent hysterectomy. Patients were assessed every 3 month after hysterectomy and tubular ligation for 12 months. Irritable bowel syndrome was diagnosed by a questionnaire based on Rome II criteria.

RESULTS:

During 12 months after surgeries, 19 (11%) patients in tubular ligation group and 19 (11%) in hysterectomy group had abdominal pain with at least two symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. Irritable bowel syndrome was diagnosed in 9 (5%) patients in the tubular ligation and 13 (8%) patients in hysterectomy groups (P>0.05). In both studied groups, the most prevalent symptoms along with abdominal pain were chronic constipation and abnormal bowel movement and the least prevalent were diarrhea and passage of mucus.

CONCLUSION:

These results suggest that gynecological surgeries (tubular ligation and hysterectomy) may predispose to the development of the irritable bowel syndrome.

KEYWORDS:

Hysterectomy; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; Tubular Ligation

PMID:
24834172
PMCID:
PMC4017415

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center