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Science. 2014 May 16;344(6185):711-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1251358.

Border control--a membrane-linked interactome of Arabidopsis.

Author information

1
Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution for Science, CA 94305, USA.
2
Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.
3
Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution for Science, CA 94305, USA. Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science, Virginia Polytechnic University and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.
4
Department of Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.
5
Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA.
6
Cell and Developmental Biology Section, Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
7
Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA.
8
Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution for Science, CA 94305, USA. Michigan State University-U.S. Department of Energy (MSU-DOE) Plant Research Laboratory and Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.
9
Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA. Center for Plant Aging Research, Institute for Basic Science, Department of New Biology, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu 711-873, Republic of Korea.
10
Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution for Science, CA 94305, USA. wfrommer@stanford.edu srhee@carnegiescience.edu.

Abstract

Cellular membranes act as signaling platforms and control solute transport. Membrane receptors, transporters, and enzymes communicate with intracellular processes through protein-protein interactions. Using a split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid screen that covers a test-space of 6.4 × 10(6) pairs, we identified 12,102 membrane/signaling protein interactions from Arabidopsis. Besides confirmation of expected interactions such as heterotrimeric G protein subunit interactions and aquaporin oligomerization, >99% of the interactions were previously unknown. Interactions were confirmed at a rate of 32% in orthogonal in planta split-green flourescent protein interaction assays, which was statistically indistinguishable from the confirmation rate for known interactions collected from literature (38%). Regulatory associations in membrane protein trafficking, turnover, and phosphorylation include regulation of potassium channel activity through abscisic acid signaling, transporter activity by a WNK kinase, and a brassinolide receptor kinase by trafficking-related proteins. These examples underscore the utility of the membrane/signaling protein interaction network for gene discovery and hypothesis generation in plants and other organisms.

PMID:
24833385
DOI:
10.1126/science.1251358
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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